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Brighton and Hove City Council
media release

20mph speed limits are being introduced the nine areas of the city included in phase 2 of the scheme from Monday 16 June. View the map of the of the 20mph phase 2 streets (PDF 2.69mb) to see which streets now have a 20mph limit.

Nearly 15,000 people responded to the consultation for the second phase covering nine areas of the city (PDF 2.62mb), and the environment, transport and sustainability committee gave approval on Wednesday 4 March. In the phase 2 areas, we are introducing 20mph limits in the streets where the majority of respondents supported the proposals.

The aim of introducing the limit is to improve the street environment for all road users, including car drivers, by reducing the number and severity of collisions and casualties on the city’s roads, improving traffic flows and making the city a safer and better place to live in.

We hope that making the streets safer and more pleasant to use will encourage more cycling and walking especially for local trips. This will not only bring road safety benefits, but will also help to improve overall health and wellbeing, reduce congestion and could improve air quality.

A wide range national and international research shows that 20mph speed limits lead to a reduction in road collisions and the severity of casualties, improves in the quality of life of local neighbourhoods and encourages more walking and cycling for local trips. A Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents study showed that at 20mph there was a 2.5% chance of pedestrians being fatally injured, compared to a 20% chance at 30mph. A Department for Transport paper on setting local speed limits reports that on urban roads with low average traffic speeds, any 1mph reduction in average speed can reduce the frequency of collision frequency by around 6%.

Where it’s the limit, it’s the law…

20mph is now the legal speed limit on most roads in central Brighton & Hove – please look out for the signs.

The city centre was Phase 1 of the 20mph scheme (PDF 5.8mb) to introduce the speed limit for residential and shopping streets in the city, approved at Transport Committee in January 2013. The 20mph limit was introduced in central Brighton & Hove in April 2013 and is now legally enforceable. Limits for the phase 2 streets (PDF 2.69mb) will be introduced from 16 June 2014.

The overall project budget is £1.5m spread over three to four years but this will be reviewed annually.

Frequently asked questions

Why are you proposing to introduce a 20mph limit for most of Brighton & Hove?

Following public consultation in 2012 and a growing number of petitions from local communities, a majority of residents across the city have told us they are in favour of the reduced limit for residential and local shopping areas.

National and international research is increasingly showing that a 20mph speed limit leads to a reduction in road collisions and the severity of casualties, improves in the quality of life of local neighbourhoods and encourages more walking and cycling for local trips. This in turn would bring significant health benefits and reduce congestion, all of which should make our city a better place to live, work in and visit.

A Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents study showed that at 20mph there was a 2.5% chance of pedestrians being fatally injured, compared to a 20% chance at 30mph. A Department for Transport paper on setting local speed limits also reports that, on urban roads with low average traffic speeds, any 1mph reduction in average speed can reduce the frequency of collision frequency by around 6%.

Following the initial consultation in 2011 and introduction of the city centre limit in April 2013, the plan has always been to consult on the following phases as early as possible. There is enough evidence to show how 20mph limits improve road safety without waiting to show the effectiveness of introducing the limits in the city centre. However, early monitoring from the first six months of Phase 1 in the city centre shows there has been:

  • A decrease in traffic speed on 74% on the roads.
  • A significant reduction in the number and severity of collisions, and no fatal collisions since implementation. This includes a 20% decrease in the number of collisions and a 19% decrease in the number of casualties (based on five months of 2013 data compared with the three year average for the same five months in the previous three years.)

Which roads will be included?

The first phase includes most of the residential streets in central Brighton & Hove, plus the commercial heart of the city. Most major roads and the more significant or arterial routes beyond the Phase 1 central area are proposed to remain at their current limits, including the A259 seafront road, Old Shoreham Road, New Church Road, Ditchling Road, London Road and Lewes Road.

The phase 2 proposals focus on residential streets, and we’ve introduced 20mph limits in the streets where the majority of respondents supported the proposals. We’ll be asking residents in the phase 3 for their views on which roads in their areas should be included or excluded later this summer.

A 20mph limit or ‘blanket ban’ across the entire city has never been part of the proposals

Is my street/neighbourhood included?

All streets within the Phase 1 area (PDF 5.8mb) are included. We consulted on the neighbourhoods and individual roads included in phase 2 (PDF 2.69mb) and are introducing 20mph limits in the streets where the majority of respondents supported the proposals.

Will the new 20mph limits be enforced?

The 20mph limits will be enforced in the same way that the 30mph has been. Where 20mph limits are installed, they are both legal and enforceable. Under the Road Traffic Act 1984, local authorities have the legal power to set speed limits on roads under their control. The limits are enforceable by the police and speed guns can detect speeds below 20mph. Please remember, where it’s the limit, it’s the law.

How long will it take to implement the proposal?

The 20mph speed limit was introduced in the city centre in April 2013, and to the phase 2 streets from 16 June 2014. Consultation on the remaining phase 3 areas will begin later this year.

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